theonlymagicleftisart:

(Jason Solo)

theonlymagicleftisart:

(Jason Solo)

Sunday May 19 01:29pm
niqueivia:

maxistentialist:

Cards Against Humanity.

Gee, I wonder why there are so many racist and sexist jokes in the game with these guys at the helm.
Don’t get me wrong, once you remove the problematic content (about one and a half expansion boxes worth of cards) it’s still really fucking fun to play, but I shouldn’t have to remove that many cards to have a game that doesn’t make me feel weird.
The first time I played was with the guy I was dating at the time, and I had to judge a particular round. He played the “wifely duties” card and expected to win. Seriously. That’s not even the worst thing I’ve seen done.
I get that it’s a card game marketed to a Certain Type of Person, but there’s no reason it can’t be friendly and still fun.


I think the game you’re looking for is called “Apples to Apples”. You might want to take out the Helen Keller card though, just to be safe. /s

niqueivia:

maxistentialist:

Cards Against Humanity.

Gee, I wonder why there are so many racist and sexist jokes in the game with these guys at the helm.

Don’t get me wrong, once you remove the problematic content (about one and a half expansion boxes worth of cards) it’s still really fucking fun to play, but I shouldn’t have to remove that many cards to have a game that doesn’t make me feel weird.

The first time I played was with the guy I was dating at the time, and I had to judge a particular round. He played the “wifely duties” card and expected to win. Seriously. That’s not even the worst thing I’ve seen done.

I get that it’s a card game marketed to a Certain Type of Person, but there’s no reason it can’t be friendly and still fun.

I think the game you’re looking for is called “Apples to Apples”. You might want to take out the Helen Keller card though, just to be safe.


/s

Wednesday May 8 08:17pm

pomegranatelips said: STOP BEING PERFECT

STOP NOT HAVING SNAPHAT! Ps hello from drunky Michael

Saturday Apr 27 02:03am

Pug puppies taking a bath (x).

Sunday Mar 17 03:16am
npr:


These cards, collected by Langston Hughes and held with his papers in Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, advertised “rent parties” to be held in Harlem in the 1940s and 1950s.


Hosts of these gatherings opened up their apartments for a night, charging a fee to guests in return for live music, dancing, and socializing. Food was extra, and the accumulated cash went to help the hosts pay their rent. Sandra L. West points out that black tenants in Harlem during the 1920s and 1930s faced discriminatory rental rates. That, along with the generally lower salaries for black workers, created a situation in which many people were short of rent money. These parties were originally meant to bridge that gap.

Langston Hughes’ collection of rent party cards : Slate.com 
Photo: Courtesy the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University.
These sound like a good time and remind me of the rent party on “Good Times.” — tanya b.

npr:

These cards, collected by Langston Hughes and held with his papers in Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, advertised “rent parties” to be held in Harlem in the 1940s and 1950s.

Hosts of these gatherings opened up their apartments for a night, charging a fee to guests in return for live music, dancing, and socializing. Food was extra, and the accumulated cash went to help the hosts pay their rent. Sandra L. West points out that black tenants in Harlem during the 1920s and 1930s faced discriminatory rental rates. That, along with the generally lower salaries for black workers, created a situation in which many people were short of rent money. These parties were originally meant to bridge that gap.

Langston Hughes’ collection of rent party cards : Slate.com

Photo: Courtesy the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University.

These sound like a good time and remind me of the rent party on “Good Times.” — tanya b.

Friday Mar 15 12:14pm
Unfortunate GPOY

Unfortunate GPOY

Wednesday Feb 6 05:10pm

“Admit it. You aren’t like them. You’re not even close. You may occasionally dress yourself up as one of them, watch the same mindless television shows as they do, maybe even eat the same fast food sometimes. But it seems that the more you try to fit in, the more you feel like an outsider, watching the “normal people” as they go about their automatic existences. For every time you say club passwords like “Have a nice day” and “Weather’s awful today, eh?”, you yearn inside to say forbidden things like “Tell me something that makes you cry” or “What do you think deja vu is for?”. Face it, you even want to talk to that girl in the elevator. But what if that girl in the elevator (and the balding man who walks past your cubicle at work) are thinking the same thing? Who knows what you might learn from taking a chance on conversation with a stranger? Everyone carries a piece of the puzzle. Nobody comes into your life by mere coincidence. Trust your instincts. Do the unexpected. Find the others…” ― Timothy Leary

Tuesday Jan 29 09:47pm
Wednesday Jan 9 10:35pm

Anonymous said: Been a total stalker and have been reading all your posts :). They are so refreshingly honest and well written. I have a question, coming from a religious background what made you switch over to Atheism and how old were you? How do your parents feel about it? Those are enough prying questions. Keep on writing.

Growing up in a God-centered household, I always felt as if I wasn’t doing something right, or I was somehow different because I never experienced god in my life. Whenever I talked to other Christians about it, I was told that it was common among those who needed to have more faith, or had too much sin in their lives. For a long time, I believed it. I put the blame on myself, resulting in a pretty viscous cycle of reaching for God, grasping nothing, and then hating myself for it. I knew (and know) the theology behind Christianity really well; it’s about faith, not works… Jesus saves us through unconditional love etc. But when, after years of searching, there was absolutely no sense of God in my life… I began to question why I was trying at all. This coincided with interacting with other people from different religious and non-religious backgrounds during my teens. Seeing others happily live their lives without a God, coupled with a realization that the anti-science creationism stuff I grew up on was most likely bullshit, really made me question why I was beating myself up over a faith I wasn’t even sure I believed in.
Still, I knew my relationship with my family and my local community in Idaho would benefit greatly from a similar faith. I enrolled in an outdoor program at a bible college in Alberta, hoping to restart my faith and give it another go. Long story short, I grew a lot, but not in my faith life. Fast forward a year or so. I was enrolled at SPU, and had a sudden, powerful realization: this is all there is. An afterlife would be grand, but there’s absolutely no evidence for it. Religions have come and gone long before Judaism or its evolved descendants, and will continue to do so. Why should I spend my time tormented over a faith that has never been real to me? Shouldn’t I be focusing on the here and now, rather than on things that are most likely nonexistent? The more we learn about the world, the more it contradicts Holy Scripture. Should I be practicing a faith that has at times contradicted my conscience? All these realizations hit me at once, and for a split second I was able to take a step back and realize what exactly we are: little living specks of star dust that are whirling on a slightly larger speck in the middle of a unfathomably large universe. As scary and incredible as it seems, that’s what we are, and to me that made life infinitely more meaningful. Life is what we make it, and we only have one chance.
To wrap up, I stopped believing about 2 years ago. Because the universe is so unfathomable, I’m not opposed to believing in a God; I’ve just never had an experience that gave me any reassurance of such a being. I told my parents in perhaps milder language, and they didn’t take it so well. It was (and is) especially hard to see my own father hurt by my non-belief. At the same time, I can’t really help it, and it is sincerely what I believe. I’m still wishful for a certain form of fate or deeper meaning in life, and perhaps that will come with time. For now, I’m much happier over all than I was when I tried to force myself into believing in a God.
Holy smokes, I can’t believe I wrote this on my phone. Apologies for the lengthiness, errors, and roundabout way of answering your question, but I really appreciate you asking, stranger! :)

Thursday Jan 3 04:30am
Guhhhhh

Guhhhhh

Wednesday Jan 2 09:13pm
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